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Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

EUCLID BEACH PARK GRAND CAROUSEL

PRESERVED AT THE WESTERN RESERVE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN CLEVELAND

Yes, we used our tokens handed out when you pay museum admission, to take a ride.

Yes we are older than the parents of the kids riding the Carousel.

Yes we picked a horse that moves up and down, shunning the stationary ponies.

Yes we are so big, we feared the piston that moves the horse might break.

Yes we took these photos.

http://www.wrhs.org/explore/exhibits/euclid-beach-park-grand-carousel/


Monday, June 20, 2016

Sunday, June 19, 2016

GOOD MONDAY MORNING, EUCLID


KUDOS FOR CREATING THE WATERFRONT IMPROVEMENTS PLAN

Euclid’s vision to provide unprecedented public waterfront access, habitat enhancements and upland stability is moving closer to reality.
Click to EnlargePhase II of Euclid’s waterfront plan is in the engineering and design stages and positioned to break ground in 2017. Complementing the 250’ James Farrell Memorial Fishing Pier, rededicated in August 2013, the $11.5M Phase II project features a three-quarter mile multipurpose public trail along the shoreline heading east from Sims Park to E.246th Street. Engineered offshore rock structures to improve wave action and sediment flow, revetments to protect the upland and public access points connecting the trail are also included. At the western terminus – just past the location of a future marina - a sand “paddle-craft beach” will be created to launch kayaks, canoes and other small craft into Lake Erie.

http://www.cityofeuclid.com/community/development/EuclidWaterfrontImprovementsPlan

Saturday, June 18, 2016

Miami-Dade property values surge nearly 9 percent in 2016

Estimates of taxable values at the start of 2016 show Miami-Dade 
real estate at a new peak, with 8.6 percent growth countywide

from the Miami Herald

Property values grew 8.6 percent across Miami-Dade at the start of 2016, with $5 billion in new construction driving tax rolls to new levels and allowing local governments to reap windfalls in revenue for the next budget year.

Every local jurisdiction saw growth in taxable values on real estate, with North Miami Beach leading the pack with a 16.6 percent gain, and Virginia Gardens bringing up the rear with a mere 0.3 percent increase.

When it comes to a hot real estate market, tiny El Portal can claim the top spot.

It saw 13.8 percent growth in the taxable value of existing properties, which are now worth $130 million.

A close second went to the Normandy Shores taxing district within Miami Beach (up 12.3 percent) and third place went to Bay Harbor Islands, with a 10.9 percent gain.

PlusUrbia Design commends the Mayor, Village Council and Administration for create such value in an historic Village.

PlusUrbia is proud to serve as the Village's Planning and Zoning staff while working to create a Form-Based Code to regulate managed growth and improve amentities in El Portal.

http://whttp://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article80989917.htmlww.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article80989917.html

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article80989917.html#storylink=cpy


Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article80989917.html#storylink=cpy





Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article80989917.html#storylink=cpy

Friday, June 17, 2016

PLAYHOUSE SQUARE


CLEVELAND, OHIO

Playhouse Square, is the Cleveland Theater District in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, the largest performing arts center in the United States outside of New York.

Only Lincoln Center in New York City is larger.

Constructed in a span of 19 months in the early 1920s, the theaters were subsequently closed down, but were revived through a grassroots effort.

Their renovation and reopening helped usher in a new era of downtown revitalization in Cleveland, and was called "one of the top ten successes in Cleveland history."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Playhouse_Square

Thursday, June 16, 2016

LINK PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES TO BETTER MOBILITY


AN IDEA WITH A LOT OF POTENTIAL, FROM DESIGNER ANDREW PERSOFF


Link proposes to create a car hire system tailored to the needs of, and designed in conjunction with, mobility users.

In viewing disability as a creative starting point, rather than a concession, Link will yield a service that is accessible and open to all.

http://linkproject.uk/ 


Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Little deals highlight big potential in Little Havana

INVESTORS ARE FLIPPING PROPERTIES FOR BIG DOLLARS



from the Real Deal

Under-the-radar sales in Miami neighborhoods like Little Havana and the Miami River underscore the potential for commercial activity just outside the bustling Greater Downtown Miami market.
Little Havana in particular has become a magnet for multifamily investment, broker Patricia Rotsztain told The Real Deal. Rotsztain brokered the sale of two buildings for about $80,000 per apartment in May, and said that asking prices rose by about 30 percent from the time of contract to closing. 
501 Northeast Sixth Court in Little Havana sold for $2.3 million
501 Northeast Sixth Court in Little Havana sold for $2.3 million
“Now, it’s very hard to find a building for sale at less than $120,000 per door,” Rotsztain, of Rotsztain & Sulichin, said.
The three-story, 24-unit building at 1528 Northwest Third Street sold for $1.92 million in mid May, up from $1.68 million in 2014. The buyer, a Brooklyn-based LLC, plans to renovate the 1923-building and bring the rents up to market rate, Rotsztain said. Pre-renovation, a two-bedroom unit may go for about $700 a month, she said.
In Miami, the median rent in May for a two-bedroom was $2,550, according to listing service Zumper. In Little Havana, a two-bedroom apartment rents for a median of $1,795 to $1,850, Zumper said.
The second building, at 501 Northeast Sixth Court, sold to a Latin American buyer for $2.3 million, Rotsztain said. That deal has yet to clear records, but the new owner has similar plans for the three-story, 29-unit building. Property records show it last sold in 2014 for $1.6 million. The apartments were built in 1925.
Developers and investors are banking on Little Havana’s success. Last year, a neighborhood supermarket in East Little Havana sold for $1.06 million. That property is zoned T6-8-O, and is near Ball & Chain, Azucar Ice Cream and Domino Park. It sold for about $100 per square foot, based on land value.
Just last week, a small strip mall at 1860 West Flagler Street sold for $1.9 million, according to Waterfront Investment Real Estate. Just 13 months prior, the property traded hands for $960,000, netting the seller $850,000.
For residents, Little Havana offers cheaper rents than nearby areas like downtown Miami and Brickell.
New York-based Burke Leighton paid nearly $11 million for a newly completed apartment building at 1430 Southwest First Street in February.
“This location is very striking,” company adviser Morris Matalon told TRD at the time. “We decided to go to Little Havana because of its proximity to Brickell.”
- See more at: http://therealdeal.com/miami/2016/06/02/little-deals-highlight-big-potential-in-little-havana/#sthash.gVFAU39q.dpuf
Under-the-radar sales in Miami neighborhoods like Little Havana and the Miami River underscore the potential for commercial activity just outside the bustling Greater Downtown Miami market.
Little Havana in particular has become a magnet for multifamily investment, broker Patricia Rotsztain told The Real Deal. Rotsztain brokered the sale of two buildings for about $80,000 per apartment in May, and said that asking prices rose by about 30 percent from the time of contract to closing.


501 Northeast Sixth Court in Little Havana sold for $2.3 million
“Now, it’s very hard to find a building for sale at less than $120,000 per door,” Rotsztain, of Rotsztain & Sulichin, said.

The three-story, 24-unit building at 1528 Northwest Third Street sold for $1.92 million in mid May, up from $1.68 million in 2014. The buyer, a Brooklyn-based LLC, plans to renovate the 1923-building and bring the rents up to market rate, Rotsztain said. Pre-renovation, a two-bedroom unit may go for about $700 a month, she said.

In Miami, the median rent in May for a two-bedroom was $2,550, according to listing service Zumper. In Little Havana, a two-bedroom apartment rents for a median of $1,795 to $1,850, Zumper said.

The second building, at 501 Northeast Sixth Court, sold to a Latin American buyer for $2.3 million, Rotsztain said. That deal has yet to clear records, but the new owner has similar plans for the three-story, 29-unit building. Property records show it last sold in 2014 for $1.6 million. The apartments were built in 1925.

Developers and investors are banking on Little Havana’s success. Last year, a neighborhood supermarket in East Little Havana sold for $1.06 million. That property is zoned T6-8-O, and is near Ball & Chain, Azucar Ice Cream and Domino Park. It sold for about $100 per square foot, based on land value.

Just last week, a small strip mall at 1860 West Flagler Street sold for $1.9 million, according to Waterfront Investment Real Estate. Just 13 months prior, the property traded hands for $960,000, netting the seller $850,000.

For residents, Little Havana offers cheaper rents than nearby areas like downtown Miami and Brickell.

New York-based Burke Leighton paid nearly $11 million for a newly completed apartment building at 1430 Southwest First Street in February.

“This location is very striking,” company adviser Morris Matalon told TRD at the time. “We decided to go to Little Havana because of its proximity to Brickell.”


http://therealdeal.com/miami/2016/06/02/little-deals-highlight-big-potential-in-little-havana/



Investors are flipping properties for big profits
Investors are flipping properties for big profits
Investors are flipping properties for big profits
nvestors are flipping properties for big profits
nvestors are flipping properties for big profits

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

THE FABULOUS ARCADE

 CLEVELAND, OHIO

The Arcade in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, is a Victorian-era structure of two nine-story buildings, joined by a five-story arcade with a glass skylight spanning over 300 feet (91 m), along the four balconies. Erected in 1890, at a cost of $867,000, the Arcade opened on Memorial Day (May 30, 1890), and is identified as one of the earliest indoor shopping malls in the United States. The Arcade was modified in 1939, remodeling the Euclid Avenue entrance and adding some structural support.

The Arcade was built in 1890 by Detroit Bridge Co., run by Stephen V. Harkness. It is a unique architectural treasure of 19th century urban America. Designed by John Eisenmann, the Arcade is one of the few remaining arcades of its kind in the United States. Modeled after the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II located in Milan, the Arcade comprises two nine-story towers with a skylight, 100 feet (30 m) high, made of 1,800 panes of glass spanning over 300 feet (91 m). The construction was financed by John D. Rockefeller, Marcus Hanna, Charles F. Brush and several other wealthy Clevelanders of the day.


The Arcade is a cross between a lighted court and a commercial shopping street. The building is a complex of three structures: two nine-story office buildings facing out to Euclid and Superior Avenues, connected via the five-story iron-and-glass enclosed arcade. The Richardsonian arched entrance along Superior Avenue is original, but the Euclid Avenue front was remodeled in 1939 by the firm of Walker and Weeks.

The level of the Superior Avenue entrance is about 12 feet (3.7 m) lower than the Euclid entrance, so that there are two bottom arcade floors, joined by staircases at each end. Since Euclid and Superior avenues are not parallel, a passage leads, at a 23-degree angle, off the Euclid entrance to a rotunda at the southern end of the Arcade. The arcade itself is a 300-foot (91 m)-long covered light court, ringed by four levels of balconies, which step back above the Euclid Avenue level. The vertical lines of the columns, rising nearly 100 feet (33 m) to the glass roof, create a spacious domed interior.

In 2001, the Hyatt corporation redeveloped the Arcade into Cleveland's first Hyatt Regency hotel. The Hyatt Regency occupies the two towers and the top three floors of the atrium area. The two lower floors of the atrium area remain open to the public with retail merchants and a food court. In addition, the Hyatt's lobby and offices are located near the Superior Avenue entrance. That same year, the skylight was also replaced.


Monday, June 13, 2016

THOUGHTS ON ORLANDO TRAGEDY

LOVE, NOT HATE, HEALS WOUNDS
 
Orlando is an unthinkable tragedy.
 
I do not have words to express the pain I feel for the loss of life and traumatizing injuries to the LGBT community that I respect and embrace.
 
But please, let's not demonize all Muslims because of Orlando.
 
Timothy McVeigh killed 168 and injured more than 600, but we don't expel all white male military vets because one was a monster.
 
There will always be evil doers -- you can find them hiding behind every religion, race and belief system.
 
Their actions are not symbolic of the everyday person who shares their birth region or core beliefs -- that monsters so often pervert to justify their violence.
 
The people I've known who practice the Muslim faith are some of the most kind, welcoming, accommodating human beings I've ever had the pleasure of sharing time with.
 
This includes a Jordanian family in Ohio that has adopted my 79-year-old mom as their own.
 
With me being busy with work and caregiving 1200 miles away in Miami, my mom would not have a good quality of life without the unconditional neighborly love of the upstairs neighbors at my mom's apartment.
 
 They are hosting, loving, caring people who are emblematic of real Muslim and Arabic values.
 
Please let's not let our anger overtake our ability to differentiate between extremists who create hell on earth and the overwhelming majority of people who may practice a faith different than our own -- but are giving, loving, valuable human beings.
 
Diversity. America needs to appreciate it and embrace it.

Sunday, June 12, 2016

GOOD MORNING


EUCLID, OHIO

The National Cleveland-Style Polka Hall of Fame is home to many nationally known Cleveland-Style polka stars throughout history. Some of the biggest and best talents are found right here within our walls. Please explore this site and learn all about the Cleveland-Style polka sound and some of the musicians who have contributed throughout the years.

The National Cleveland-Style Polka Hall of Fame was founded in 1987 by musicians and leaders of Slovenian and ethnic organizations. The museum traces the story of the city's home-grown sound from its roots in the old Slovenian neighborhoods to nationwide popularity with audio exhibits, historic photographs and original instruments. The archive preserves 6,000 vintage recordings, dating back to 1913.

Friday, June 10, 2016

HAPPY 28TH ANNIVERSARY, SWEETIE

JUNE 11, 1988, TWO NE OHIO KIDS TIE THE KNOT

It's been an epic journey:

First house

Law School graduation

First professional jobs

Promotions

Resignations

Home remodeling and refinancing

A book co-authored and published before we were 30

The passing of both our father's, near age 80

A miracle move to Miami, the Magic City

Elections won

Elections lost

1920s house upgrade to modern wheelchair access

Trips all over Spain

Visits to Florence, Italy

Annual pilgrimages to NYC

Spiritual journeys to the heart of Monument Valley

Audiences with celebrities, murderers and Kings

Flights to Colombia on a whim

Too many surgeries and rehabs to count

Turning gray haired

Caring for a herd of donkey in central Ohio

Presenting at top-flight universities

Endless battles to protect and enhance the civil rights of people with disabilities

Awards

Car thefts

Last second dashes through torrential rain to claim the last half price seats of a Broadway show

Nightly visits from ghosts South of Granada

John's dog Brutus

Puchy, the angel dog

Honey Bear, the Princess of Siam, our Siamese rescue cat baby



CALLE OCHO INTERVIEW BY THE ATLANTIC MONTHLY'S



CityLabLatino/Univision

PlusUrbia Design's Juan Mullerat shares a vision for a people-friendly Calle Ocho Corridor.

The interview is in Spanish:

https://www.facebook.com/950763244980533/videos/vb.950763244980533/1118891301501059/?type=2&theater

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Federal Donuts opening first location outside Philadelphia

 

In Miami’s Wynwood

 

We are thrilled about this for many reasons:

  • Federal Donuts has the best food we tasted outside of the famous Reading Terminal Market when we were in Philly last summer.

  •  We are affiliated with PlusUrbia Design, the Miami-based studio that created the Wynwood Neighborhood Revitalization District that ushered in unprecedented development.

  •  We are big fans for Fortis Development Group, the visionary developer that created 250 Wynwood.

  •  Who doesn't want to ring in the New Year in 2017 with chocolate donuts and Korean Fried Chicken?

Courtesy of the Real Deal

By Ina Cordle

Federal Donuts will open its first location outside Philadelphia in Miami at 250 Wynwood, as the artsy neighborhood continues to attract trendy eateries, The Real Deal has learned.


The popular shop, which serves gourmet donuts as well as Korean-style fried chicken created by Philadelphia chef Michael Solomonov, signed a 10-year lease for a 2,200-square-foot retail space.

The asking rent was $65 a square foot, and the store will open in January 2017, a Thor spokesman told TRD

In September, New York-based Thor Equities began leasing two retail spaces with an option to buy at 250 Wynwood, a new six-story condo project at 250 Northwest 24th Street developed by Fortis Development Group.

 The other retail space, with 1,800 square feet, is in contract negotiations, the Thor spokesman said.

http://federaldonuts.com/main/ 

www.plusurbia.com 

http://therealdeal.com/miami/2016/06/08/federal-donuts-opening-first-location-outside-philadelphia-in-miamis-wynwood/ 



Monday, June 6, 2016

PlusUrbia Design’s “LA TERRACITA” parklet



Named Finalist for 2016 Public Space Challenge by the Miami Foundation


PlusUrbia Design’s vision to create a parklet out of parking spaces in Little Havana is a finalist in the 2016 Public Space Challenge sponsored by the Miami Foundation. The Coconut Grove-based studio’s proposal for a low-cost, high-impact urban oasis was chosen from more than 400 submissions.

PlusUrbia is well-known for its urban interventions in Little Havana, including myCalle8.org - for a complete streets redesign of Calle Ocho. The studio’s parklet would create a public gathering space (to play dominoes or to just hang out) in a densely populated area in a neighborhood with one of the lowest indexes of open space per capita in the country. 

“La Terracita creates a gathering place in the dense urban neighborhood lacking on open space. Diversity, density and proximity to jobs are East Little Havana’s strengths. But all those people have very few places to gather to play dominoes, discuss politics and rest their bones on comfortable chairs,” said Camila Zablah, a designer at PlusUrbia.

“This parklet is for the locals, away from the tourists of Calle8. Separated from traffic, raised above street level to connect to the existing sidewalk, this small grouping of tables and chairs can be the start of something big – an emphasis on livability in Little Havana.”


Parklets can be replicated throughout Miami to create welcoming open spaces in urban areas.