Follow by Email

Wednesday, December 19, 2018

SECOND-HAND MARKETS AND ANTIQUE DEALERS

PARIS, FRANCE

In the heart of Paris in the Marais district, the little streets and courtyards of the village Saint-Paul are home to numerous antique dealers.

Close to the Eiffel tower, the Village Suisse, is a unique gathering of art galleries, decoration and antique shops.

L’Avant-Cour offers carefully-chosen objects from all around the world. 

You will also find shops with antique and hand-crafted jewelry. 

As for the brocantes or second-hand markets, they liven up different parts of the city every weekend and offer a diverse selection of goods including rare and old books, vintage clothing, toys and unusual objects.

Over towards Saint-Germain-des-Prés and as far as the Musée d’Orsay, some 110 antique dealers make up the Carre Rive Gauche.

--parisinfo.com

Tuesday, December 18, 2018

COMMISSARIAT DE POLICE DU 12ÈME ARRONDISSEMENT

PARIS, FRANCE

Despite looking vaguely art-deco in form, the structure was actually designed by architects Manolo Nunez-Yanowski and Miriam Teitelbaum in 1991, and houses the Commissariat de Police du 12ème arrondissement (the local police station).

Although the curves of the building are merely derivative, what makes it really noticeable are of course the sculptured human forms jutting out from the balconies on the top floor.

Sometimes labelled caryatids in descriptions of the building, these are actually telamons or atlantes, as the figure is most definitely male! In fact, the figure is based on Michelangelo’s dying slave sculpture which can be found today in the Louvre.

Manolo Nunez-Yanowski is very much a postmodern architect, and unsurprisingly worked with Ricardo Bofill on several projects. 

Indeed, two of their most well-known creations can be seen alongside each other in the town of Noisy le Grand to the east of Paris. 

The Arenes de Picasso for Nunez-Yanowski  (sometimes known as the camembert), and Le Palacio for Bofill. 

--parisinvisible.blogspot.com

Monday, December 17, 2018

ARCHITECTURE IN PARIS

PARIS, FRANCE

The history of Paris can be read in its stones as well as in books.

A monumental condensation of styles which will not leave the attentive stroller unmoved.

Antiquity left a heritage of its public baths and arenas to the city. 

The Middle Ages remains present with the Romanesque bell-tower of Saint-German-des-Près, and the delicacy of the Sainte Chapelle affirms the miracle of Gothic.

Paris is also the Classicism of the Grand Siècle, its domes and pediments, its dream of Antiquity already touched by the Renaissance.

You will be charmed by the eclecticism of the Second Empire, the thrust of Haussmann’s boulevards, and the metal architecture celebrated by the Eiffel Tower, which spearheaded Art Nouveau.

Art Deco did not lag far behind, and its modernity heralded the future concrete-and-glass emblems of a city in constant renewal.

--parisinfo.com

Sunday, December 16, 2018

ÎLE SAINT-LOUIS

PARIS, FRANCE

Île Saint-Louis is the smaller of the two islands in the centre of Paris.

It is located in the historical centre of the city and is a great place for a walk full of surprises.

Stroll along the main road, Rue Saint-Louis en l'Île, or go around the island along the quays.

Visitors can admire the numerous former private mansion houses from the 17th and 18th centuries.

Foodies will love the delicious ice cream at Berthillon.

--parisinfo.com

Saturday, December 15, 2018

QUARTIER PIGALLE

PARIS, FRANCE


The Pigalle district, faithful to its festive reputation, continues to enliven Parisian nights.

From the Place d'Anvers to the Place de Clichy, everything is there for intense nocturnal festivities: cabarets, theatres, bars, clubs, cheeky shops.

To walk the streets of SoPi, no need to wait for the evening: you can enjoy trendy shops and gourmet addresses all day.

--parisinfo.com

Friday, December 14, 2018

GRAND PALAIS

PARIS, FRANCE

The Grand Palais is one of the most iconic Parisian monuments.

Built for the 1900 Exposition Universelle, it is recognizable by its large glass dome flanked by the French flag.

This architectural masterpiece of stone, steel and glass has been listed as a historical monument since 2000.

It comprises 3 major sites: the Nave, the National Galleries and the Palais de la Découverte.

The majestic nave, 240 m long, welcomes a wide variety of major national and international events: (horse riding, contemporary art, fairground, etc.).

The national galleries organize large-scale exhibitions on artists that have marked the history of art (Picasso, Hopper, Renoir, etc.).

The Palais de la Découverte is a museum and cultural centre dedicated to science, where children can learn whilst having fun, through permanent collections and temporary exhibitions.

--parisinfo.com

Thursday, December 13, 2018

MOULIN ROUGE

PARIS, FRANCE

The Moulin Rouge was immortalized by Toulouse-Lautrec and was the cradle of the music hall with the famous Mistinguett.

Since it opened in 1889, it has dazzled the whole world. Edith Piaf, Liza Minnelli, Frank Sinatra and Elton John … numerous French and international personalities have over the years become enamoured of this legendary cabaret.

The room is magnificently decorated in belle époque style and red velvet, with typical burlesque frescoes.

A wonderful place to enjoy gourmet French food by the Chef David le Quellec, served with champagne - the official drink of the cabaret.

Admire a troupe of 60 artists from all over the world who perform twice each evening in the revue 'Féerie', a show made up of four breathtaking acts: feathers, rhinestones, sequins, sparkling decor, acrobats, original music, international attractions.

--parisinfo.com

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

MUSÉE D'ORSAY

PARIS, FRANCE

Internationally renowned for its rich collection of Impressionist art, the Musée d'Orsay also displays all Western artistic creation from 1848 to 1914.

Its collections represent all expressive forms, from painting to architecture, as well as sculpture, the decorative arts and photography.

You're sure to be dazzled by the beauty of the place: a train station that looks like a palace, inaugurated for the 1900 Universal Exposition.

At the end of 2011, the museum reopened all of its entirely renovated spaces as well as some new rooms: an additional 400 m² for the Pavillon Amont, Post-Impressionist artists at the heart of the museum.



Tuesday, December 11, 2018

QUARTIER MONTORGUEIL

PARIS, FRANCE
With its small pedestrian cobblestone streets, the Montorgueil district has lots of charm.

The main artery, Rue Montorgueil, is lined with local food shops, bars and restaurants as well as trendy clothing shops.

In the early morning, delivery trucks and a bustling atmosphere reflect the Paris of yesteryear.

In the streets parallel to Rue Montorgueuil, new restaurants, cocktail bars and bobo shops have opened, notably in Rue Saint-Sauveur, Rue Bachaumont, Rue Greneta, Rue Mandar and in the Passage du Grand Cerf.

--PARISINFO.COM

Monday, December 10, 2018

CITY OF MIAMI SUES STATE OVER LONG-DELAYED FLAGLER STREET CONSTRUCTION



THANK YOU COMMISSIONER REYES, COMMISSIONER HIGGINS 
AND ALL ELECTED AND APPOINTED OFFICIALS 
WHO ARE PROTECTING OUR RIGHTS

Thanks to all the elected and appointed officials who are holding FDOT's feet to the fire.

We stated publicly, months ago, that only a lawsuit would protect the rights of people with disabilities, the elderly, folks who use wheelchairs for mobility and all of the hard working people.

Tens of thousands in Little Havana have lost all rights to mobility in this important corridor during disastrous work.

Ultimately, damages should be paid to the dozens of business owners who have lost it all, or on the verge of losing it all due to endless delays and failure to maintain access during construction.

Failure to maintain pedestrian mobility, even during construction, is a violation of civil rights.

https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article222922770.html

Sunday, December 9, 2018

FIGHTING FOR PARK LAND IN DISTRICT 4, FIGHTING TO PRESERVE MELREESE PARK


MIAMI CITY COMMISSIONER MANOLO REYES: 
THANK YOU FROM THE BOTTOM OF OUR HEARTS


Roughly a decade ago, historic 2-acre Bryan Park was subject to a plan that would have paved it over for an out-of-scale tennis center. Noise would have ruined livability. Homes would be flooded by lost permeable surface. A compromise protected the green space.


A Herald story listed Bryan Park "improvements" and we feared this meant development on the green space. Commissioner Reyes' staff assured that the fixes are ADA enhancements to the accessible to all playground on the developed half of the park. Thank you sir.

High praise for Commissioner Manolo Reyes and his chief of staff Esteban (Steven) Ferreiro. Within 15 minutes of my sending an email to my District 4 Commissioner, I was called back with full details of a worthwhile capital improvement coming to Bryan Park

Reyes continues to be a champion for green space, being 1 of the 2 NO votes against the giveaway of precious Melreese Park to billionaire investors. May he block the 4/5ths vote needed to approve sweetheart deal that would pave over the people's land for profit.

Manolo Reyes, an elected official who listens to people and cares about them.

Saturday, December 8, 2018

SEINE

PARIS, FRANCE

The Parc Rives de Seine, with a total length of 7 kilomtres, extends along both sides of the Seine and provides a place to walk and relax along the water, in the heart of the city.

On the left bank, wander from Pont d'Alma to the Pont Royal. On the right bank you can go from Pont Neuf to the Pont du Sully, as well as the Arsenal basin between the Quai de la Rapée and Place de la Bastille.

The Parc Rives de Seine, a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site that is only open to 'soft' trafic (pedestrians and bikes), is lined with activities (playgrounds for children, picnic areas, terraces, cafes, climbing walls) and offers unusual views of some of Paris's great monuments.

-parisinfo.com

Friday, December 7, 2018

PONT ALEXANDRE III

PARIS, FRANCE

Inaugurated on the occasion of the 1900 Universal Exhibition and classed as a historic monument, the Pont Alexandre III is one of the most emblematic bridges in Paris because of its architecture and location.

At its four extremities are huge 17 metre-high pylons crowned with gilt bronze sculptures of winged horses representing the illustrious Arts, Sciences, Commerce and Industry.

Pont Alexandre III connects the Invalides on the Left Bank to the Grand Palais and Petit Palais on the Right Bank.

From the bridge you can enjoy a sweeping view of these buildings as well as the Eiffel Tower and over the Seine, which makes it a popular place for a stroll at any time of day or night.

--parisinfo.com

Thursday, December 6, 2018

CIMETIÈRE DU PÈRE LACHAISE

PARIS, FRANCE

The Père Lachaise cemetery takes its name from King Louis XIV's confessor, Father François d'Aix de La Chaise.

It is the most prestigious and most visited necropolis in Paris.

Situated in the 20th arrondissement of Paris, it extends 44 hectares and contains 70,000 burial plots.

The cemetery is a mix between an English park and a shrine.

All funerary art style are represented: Gothic graves, Haussmanian burial chambers, ancient mausoleums.

On the green paths, visitors cross the burial places of famous men and women; Honoré de Balzac, Guillaume Apollinaire, Frédéric Chopin, Colette, Jean-François Champollion, Jean de La Fontaine, Molière, Yves Montand, Simone Signoret, Jim Morrison, Alfred de Musset, Edith Piaf, Camille Pissarro and Oscar Wilde.

--parisinfo.com


Wednesday, December 5, 2018

BASILIQUE DU SACRÉ-COEUR DE MONTMARTRE

PARIS, FRANCE

The Sacré-Coeur, consecrated in 1919, is one of the most iconic monuments in Paris.

At the top of the Butte Montmarte, it has one of the most beautiful panoramic views of the capital, from 130 metres above ground.

In a Roman-Byzantine style, the Sacré Coeur is recognizable by its white colour.
Inside the building, the ceiling is decorated with the largest mosaic in France measuring about 480 m².

The crypt is also worth a visit.

And to go even higher up, visitors can access the dome where the 360° view of Paris is magnificent.

A short walk from the Sacré Coeur is the Place du Tertre, the district of Abbesses with its steep, winding roads, and at the bottom of the hill, the famous Moulin Rouge cabaret.

--Parisinfo.com

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

COMMISSIONER HIGGINS: THANKS FOR YOUR LEADERSHIP

THE FLAGLER CORRIDOR CONSTRUCTION DISASTER
CALLS FOR PRECEDENT-SETTING ACTION

Residents -- especially those with disabilities and businesses, who have gone bankrupt or are on the verge of it -- should be able to sue the contractor for damages.

Something has to be the first test project.

The people responsible should be sued.

Women used to be banned from voting, that changed for the better.

African Americans and other people of color had no civil rights and that was changed via federal legislation.

Big companies used to be allowed to pollute at will, now we have the EPA, Clean Water Act, etc.

The LBGT community was not allowed to adopt or marry, and groundbreaking action changed that – clearly for the better.

Sometimes, things are so bad, only a landmark lawsuit or landmark legislation can shake things up and protect the abused.

This mess can only be cleaned up via a landmark case for protecting the built environment – during construction – for all.

Monday, December 3, 2018

THE CIVIL RIGHTS OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES ARE BEING DENIED

THE WAR ZONE DISASTER CONSTRUCTION PROJECT ON THE FLAGLER STREET CORRIDOR IN MIAMI'S LITTLE HAVANA HAS DENIED BASIC MOBILITY TO WHEELCHAIR USERS AND OTHERS

We appreciate the Miami politicians who toured the Flagler construction debacle – and got some great press coverage from it.

With all due respect, much more must be done immediately.

We have worked in the press, public service and the urban design, architecture, transportation engineering and construction industries.

Our 30+ years of career experience perfectly enables us to evaluate the difference between reasonable delays/disruptions vs. abject (criminal?) neglect.

The Flagler reconstruction is a mess, a failure, something we're lucky the New York Times hasn't put on the front page as the worst neighborhood impact project in our nation.

Miami leaders are lucky that this disaster – on their watch – hasn’t been exposed nationally, though the people who have been trapped in their homes or who lost it all because their business had no access -- would welcome a national spotlight shined on this disaster.

Our biggest concern is lack of mobility for people with disabilities.

Sidewalks and crosswalks made impassible for months are a nightmare, especially for low income people with disabilities.

The Flagler corridor largely houses folks with very little money.

The good folks of this part of Little Havana walk to their work and daily needs.

Folks who roll in wheelchairs, some of them very shaky, fragile, old wheelchairs.

For virtually 2 years, hundreds of people with disabilities have basically been made prisoners because of this neglect.

This is a once in a lifetime issue that defines how far a leader will go to make things right for people with little to no voice.

We are encouraged by the recent tours made by city, county and state elected officials.

But we are way to old (and maybe wise) to sugar coat things.

This is a long, festering disaster of national proportions.

Significant city, county, state, nonprofit and other resources must be directed to this corridor immediately.

Poor oversight has turned it into a war zone.

We look forward to seeing how our elected leaders will dedicate themselves to a multifaceted humanitarian aid mission – to fix this mess, and to immediately help people in dire need.

Sunday, December 2, 2018

PASSAGE OF THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT WAS ONE OF PRESIDENT GEORGE H.W. BUSH'S GREATEST ACCOMPLISHMENTS


ANY OBITUARY OF THE 41ST PRESIDENT THAT FAILS TO HIGHLIGHT THE ADA ACT OF 1990 IS ADDING TO THE TREMENDOUS DISCRIMINATION AGAINST PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES.


From the beginning of time, people with disabilities have been considered half human.
Even in the 21st century, a half century past the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights legislation and more than a quarter century since the ADA as adopted, people with disabilities face harrowing discrimination.

Fewer than one percent of single family housing units are even minimally accessible to those who use an assistive mobility device, such as a wheelchair.

Millions of public spaces contain barriers to mobility.

Tens of thousands of brand new civic buildings and spaces are built in ways that segregate people with disabilities – forcing them to use humiliating side or rear doors to enter a facility.

The press, usually a bastion of championing civil rights, continues to use pejorative, 100 percent inaccurate phrases such as “wheelchair bound” and "confined to a wheelchair.”

The press, which I was a member of for nearly two decades, is embarrassing itself again today – in print, on TV, on radio and online.

Very few stories, even the super-lengthy ones reserved for the retelling of the life of a U.S. president who has died, have made any mention of Bush’s role in adopting the ADA.

The stories that mention it, make the most far-reaching civil rights legislation created for people with disabilities in the western world – sound like the 1,000th most-important thing George H.W. Bush did as a leader.

I am an Independent and a Progressive.
But I take pause today to hope that our 41st president is in a peaceful place and that his family takes comfort in the grace that he put into his career as a public servant.

Shame on any news organization that fails to list the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act as one of George Bush’s greatest accomplishments.

Far reaching-civil rights for all is very important.


Failing to see how important it is, tells us that the mainstream media still sees people with disabilities as largely worthless and deserving to remain marginalized.

https://socialwelfare.library.vcu.edu/recollections/george-bush-and-the-americans-with-disabilities-act/

Saturday, December 1, 2018

PRESIDENT GEORGE H.W. BUSH RIP

HE CROSSED THE AISLE TO CREATE THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT

President Bush the senior, the one known for his "Thousand Points of Light," worked tirelessly to create far-reaching legislation to protect the rights of people with disabilities.

Many of the most-famous Civil Rights and related legislation, to right longtime wrongs for African Americans and other people of color, was passed in 1964 with the Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson in the White House. 

But Bush, a Republican led bipartisan backing to finally, more than a quarter century after the 1964 federal Civil Rights legislation, protect the rights of people with disabilities.

More than 50,000 Americans are impacted by some degree of disability.

Bush worked with Justin Whitlock Dart, the co-founder of the American Association of People with Disabilities, who is regarded as the "Godfather of the ADA."

Dart got polio in 1948 before entering the University of Houston, where he earned undergraduate degrees in history and education in 1954.

The university refused to give him a teaching certificate because of his disability. 

The university is now home to the Justin Dart Jr. Center for Students with Disabilities, a facility designed for students who have any type of temporary or permanent health impairment, physical limitation, psychiatric disorder, or learning disability.

People with disabilities still have the highest rate of unemployment and underemployment of any minority group in America.

And the current evil version of the GOP threatens, constantly, to dissolve the ADA.

But today, we pause from our vitriol -- toward the party whose president stole the office and makes no apologies for ridiculing people with disabilities -- because (old school) GOP stalwart George H.W. Bush worked with both parties for the good of all people.


Friday, November 30, 2018

The National - Bloodbuzz Ohio



Next time I need to go back to Ohio, I'm skipping the TSA lines, cramped seats and staggering air fares.
I'm going back on a swarm of bees.

MARAIS

Paris, France

If we were to name one district in Paris that is particularly popular with the LGBT community, it would have to be the Marais. 

Most of the French capital’s gay-friendly venues are located in this neighbourhood squeezed in between Place de la Bastille, Place de la République and Hôtel de Ville.

A whole range of bars, boutiques and clubs have sprung up here over the past 30 years, turning this district into an authentic yet trendy little village drawing a disparate crowd of visitors.

The Marais is also known to be a cultural hotspot.

It has some of the top museums in Paris – the Pompidou Centre, Musee Picasso and Musee Cognacq-Jay.

--Parisinfo.com

Thursday, November 29, 2018

SAINT GERMAIN DES PRES

PARIS, FRANCE

The legendary district of Saint-Germain-des-Prés has a dual identity these days.

On the one hand, it’s filled with boutiques showcasing goods by some of the top luxury brands.

But it’s also popular with students, who like to meet up for a drink in one of the area’s numerous cafés and bars.

Vibrant, cosmopolitan Saint-Germain is definitely in vogue!

Located in the chic 6th arrondissement of Paris, Saint-Germain-des-Prés was the post-war haunt of such luminaries as Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Picasso, Man Ray, Léo Ferré and Georges Brassens.

Some of the places where the intellectual and artistic élite used to meet still exist today.

--Parisinfo.com

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

PANTHEON

PARIS, FRANCE

The Panthéon’s iconic silhouette and dome is perched at the top of the Montagne Sainte-Geneviève, the historic hill of the Latin Quarter.

Since the days of the French Revolution, this former church, dedicated to the patron saint of Paris, has housed a necropolis, in its crypt, of well-known French figures: Victor Hugo, Marie Curie, Alexandre Dumas, etc.

From April to October, tourists can enjoy the fine views of the capital from the colonnade of the dome.

--Parisinfo.com

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

CATHEDRALE NOTRE DAME

PARIS, FRANCE

The Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris, a masterpiece of Gothic architecture, is the most visited monument in France.

It was built in the Middle Ages, at the far end of the Île de la Cité.

Work started in the 13th century and finished in the 15th century.

Badly damaged during the French Revolution, the cathedral was restored in the 19th century by the architect Viollet-le-Duc.

Its many visitors come to admire its stained glass and rose windows, the towers, the steeple and the gargoyles.

They can also discover the Notre-Dame treasury and have a go at climbing the towers to enjoy a panoramic view of Paris.

In 2013, Notre-Dame is celebrated its 850th anniversary.

For this occasion, many events were organized and the cathedral renewed its bells with the arrival of eight new bells as well as a new great bell.

Road distances from Paris in France are calculated from point 0 on the cathedral forecourt.


--Parisinfo.com

Monday, November 26, 2018

ARC DE TRIOMPHE

PARIS FRANCE


Situated at the Place de l’Etoile, overlooking the Champs-Elysées, the Arc de Triomphe is the biggest arch in the world.

It was commissioned by Napoleon in 1806 to celebrate his victory at Austerlitz.

The architects Chalgrin, Joust and Blouet all worked on the monument. 

Sculptures were designed by Cortot, Rude, Etex, Pradier and Lemaire.

Beneath the arch is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and each evening at 6:30pm its flame is rekindled.

From the top of the monument, visitors benefit from a panoramic view of Paris, during the day and at night, and two viewpoint indicators.

A museum retracing the history of the Arc de Triomphe, situated within the structure, completes the visit.

--Parisinfo.com

Sunday, November 25, 2018

THANK HEAVEN FOR

CATS, OUR FUR BABIES


Honeybear has been with us for 5 years.

We guess that she’s about 8.

It turns out a neighbor down the street had her when she was a kitten and responsibly got her treated so she couldn’t have more kittens.

HB did give birth once, to a litter of 3.

The only baby of hers that we know of is a very skittish Tortie that dubbed Cocoa Kitty.

When Honeybear went out in daylight and nighttime, mother and daughter would hunt together, sand bathe together, hug and fight (as HB the queen would smack her grown kitten – just to make it clear who the king of the hill was, is and always will be).

We tried to get Cocoa Kitty to be an indoor cat, but it’s not for her. So we bought a used dogloo and set her up with food and water in the back of our house.

Before long, many cats were visiting. We bought a used small tent and used it for shelter, with a food bowl in it.

We bought cushions and built shelter out of some old benches left behind by the previous owner of our house.

When one of our most beloved visitor couples – a Maine Coon dubbed Big Boy and his lady Squirt – a tiny ginger cat – had 4 kittens, we went into action.

We worked with Miami-Dade County Animal Services (perhaps the best department in the County) to work with the Trap-Neuter-Release program.

A wonderful, soulful worker named Octavio came by long before dawn and set up a half dozen traps.

Repeating this routine over the years, we have helped far more than a dozen cats to be spared from giving birth. You can tell by their clipped single ear.

We don’t want to turn a sweet tale into a lecture.

But people really do need to be responsible and get their cats fixed – and even work with Animal Services to get in the TNR program. It doesn’t cost a penny and at the most, you will move your car out of the driveway to create room for some humane traps.

Cats, after surgery and recovery, are returned to your lot 48 to 72 hours later.


Our all-time beloved baby from TNR is Dusty.


Saturday, November 24, 2018

THANK GOODNESS FOR HONEYBEAR

OUR MEEZER MEMBER OF THE FAMILY


Before we knew it, our Siamese cat visitor had a name – we called her Honeybear.

She launched a months-long plan for getting us to fall in love with her.

It worked.

At first, she was going out when we went to bed and when we left the house.

We were still so new to cats, we feared she would soil our beds, furniture, etc.

We were too dumb to buy a litter box.

Heidi started DVRing Jackson Galaxy shows and reading things online.
Soon, Amazon was delivering cat books.

And Honeybear was only going out at night.

Soon, we loved her so much, we were afraid she might get hurt outside.
Multiple test litterboxes arrived.

She hated the covered one.

She was too big for the one labeled large.

She had a favorite dry cat food.

She had multiple water bowls.

Before we knew it, HB (as we call her when shortening her name) was inside 24-7.

When we traveled, we hired a trusted person to come in twice a day to look after Honeybear.

Mom Heidi bought air prey and other speciality toys, when we realized our Meezer’s health depended on play and exercise.

Daddy Steve welcome Honeybear into his bed.

She curled up right next to him, often snoring, frequently walking over his body and sweetly coming up to smooch him.

(part 4 tomorrow)

Friday, November 23, 2018

WE PAUSE TO GIVE THANKS FOR

OUR FELINE FRIENDS


In early fall 2013, I was on FMLA leave from a miserable job – gladly taking unpaid leave to care for Heidi, my companion of one third of a century.

She was having a hip revision and would be recovering for up to two weeks in a great hospital’s rehab ward after her daylong, brutal procedure.

I would sleep at our house and I would run home to do chores and all – allowing Heidi to rest and get crucial physical therapy.

One day, I was taking a medical device out of a ton of shipping cardboard.

A cat jumped on it and sprawled out.

She had been darting around on and under the wheelchair ramp that leads to our century old house.

We called her the mottled kitty.

Now, in the sun, I could see a beautiful Siamese cat.

She wanted to be petted.

I took some pictures and shared them with Heidi during my long visit.

She said our mottled kitty was at least 75% apple head seal point Siamese.

Not long after Heidi came home, we were out enjoying the break in the weather and doing some yard work.

The Siamese cat came over and let me pet her.

Then she took some milk.

And some kibbles – as we had bought a small bag of cat snacks.

Soon, she was visiting us inside the house for 30, 60, 90 minute periods.

(part 3 tomorrow)

Thursday, November 22, 2018

I GIVE THANKSGIVING FOR

DISCOVERING THE LOVE OF CATS 



We were a dog family growing up in exurban Ohio.

Cats were thought of as a nuisance.

They caused allergic reactions and dug up plants.

At best, something an old spinster would keep as a pet, because they were low maintenance and could be virtually ignored for weeks.

I never hated cats, but I really didn’t get them.

It’s like cats have the worst public relations firm on earth.

Every negative stereotype gets repeated in movies, TV shows, even cartoons.
Little Havana, sadly, is a dumping ground for cats.

Moving into an apartment that doesn’t allow pets, turn your poor kitty out to the streets in Little Havana.

Kids lost interest in that kitten you got for Christmas – dump it around Calle Ocho.

Didn’t get your cat fixed and have a litter bigger than you are ready to take on – cast the poor critters off to fend for themselves in the blue collar neighborhood of Shenandoah.

So we were used to cats.

We talked to them.

We had a few run in the house.

We were never mean or anything, but we just didn’t take much interest in having any kind of pet – because we travel a lot and we’re always on the go.

(see part 2 tomorrow)

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

I AM THANKFUL FOR

COCONUT GROVE ANIMAL CLINIC


We love living in Miami.

But in the big city, there are very few small town businesses that treat you like family.

Coconut Grove Animal Service is one of them.

Now operated by the 2nd and 3rd generations of Marmesh family Veterinarians, the practice has been open since 1965 – one year after we were born!

The people are amazing. Loving, intelligent, expert.

The prices are unheard of. Very fair.

Since we took in our rescue cat Honeybear about five years ago, she has been a regular at the Grove Animal Service’s quaint and slightly cramped office on Grand Avenue at 32nd Ave.

Our beloved Siamese has gotten her shots, her wellness visits and some treatments when she’s had an infection or GI symptoms.

Check out the practice at:


Tuesday, November 20, 2018

THE BEST CAT AND DOG CARE IN MIAMI

COCONUT GROVE ANIMAL CLINIC -- SINCE 1965


We love Dr. Marmesh (he gets extra points for graduating from Heidi’s alma mater, Ohio State University) and the third generation talented vet in the family – Dr. Kate Marmesh.

They have lovingly cared for our healthy Siamese rescue cat Honeybear for half a decade.

Here’s a bit more about the high quality, low cost clinic in their own words:

Coconut Grove Animal Clinic was founded during the days of the 'Old Grove.' It has been rich in family tradition and pet care ever since. 

After graduating from the University of Minnesota, Dr. Michael Marmesh, Sr. opened Coconut Grove Animal Clinic in 1965. 

His wife, Sarah Marmesh, acted as office manager, and they maintained a small-town business in an area that quickly grew up around the clinic.

In 1978, the couple was joined by their son Dr. Michael E. Marmesh, Jr. after he graduated from The Ohio State University. 

The father and son pair worked together until Dr. Marmesh, Sr. passed away in August 2000. 

Michael's wife Nancy has taken on the job of business manager after recently retiring from her work as an elementary school gifted teacher.

Most recently Dr. Kate Marmesh (daughter of Dr. Marmesh, Jr.) has come to work with her father. 

She graduated from St. George's University in May 2005 and worked in Fayetteville, Tennessee until June 2008. 

She has returned home to be the third generation in this family business.