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Friday, January 31, 2020

QUITO, EQUADOR -- 5

CALLE DE LAS SIETE CRUCES Y ROCAFUERTE




Calle de las Siete Cruces, which means Street of the Seven Crosses, officially García Moreno, after the infamous early 20th century President brutally murdered on its sidewalks, is now home to an astonishing number of visitor sites.

--Casa Gangotena

Thursday, January 30, 2020

QUITO, EQUADOR -- 4

CALLE DE LAS SIETE CRUCES Y ROCAFUERTE




The second-highest capital in the world (after La Paz, Bolivia), Quito is a lovely Andean city with an exquisite colonial centre packed with architectural treasures.

Wandering the Unesco-listed centro histórico (aka old town) is pure sensory overload.

--Lonely Planet

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

QUITO, EQUADOR -- 3

CALLE DE LAS SIETE CRUCES Y ROCAFUERTE




History lurks around every corner of this well-preserved center. 

Delve into the past by stepping off the cobblestones and entering beautifully maintained museums, historic mansions and jaw-dropping sanctuaries. 

--Lonely Planet 

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

TODAY IS NATIONAL PLAN FOR VACATION DAY


It's 2020, people with disabilities, so you have every right to demand access from your:

Hotel

Plane

Train

Boat

Park

Museum

Main Street

Beach

Any place you visit.


Authorities responsible for these transportation modes and vacation activities must  accommodate disabilities that impact: 

Mobility

Vision

Hearing

Cognitive/Emotional


Monday, January 27, 2020

QUITO, EQUADOR -- 1

CALLE DE LAS SIETE CRUCES Y ROCAFUERTE


A Spanish-colonial stunner, Quito’s vibrant Centro Historico is packed with elaborate churches and old-time monasteries (some were centuries in the making), people-packed plazas and looming bell towers. 

--Lonely Planet 

Sunday, January 26, 2020

IF I HAD ONE SUPER HERO POWER,

IT WOULD BE TO TAKE CARE OF ALL CATS


My model would be the love, care and shelter given by the people at the Largo di Torre Argentina Cat Sanctuary.

They have given a good life to our distance adoption love, wise old Siamese baby boy Tichiro.


They are located among historic ruins in the heart of Rome's Centro Storico.


Saturday, January 25, 2020

Friday, January 24, 2020

ALLEYS OF NAPLES - 12

CAMPANIA, ITALY



You never know what you’ll find when you round the corner and gaze down a Naples alley.

You might see a cruise ship docked in the harbor with Mount Vesuvius in the background.

Thursday, January 23, 2020

ALLEYS OF NAPLES - 11

CAMPANIA, ITALY



Are some Naples alleys a bit dark and narrow, even in daylight? – yes.

But that is part of the fun of mystery and exploration.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

ALLEYS OF NAPLES - 10

CAMPANIA, ITALY



The city has more than 100 alleys which intertwine from the old town to the outskirts. 

Throughout the centuries, these alleys have been given strangest and unusual names and each one reflects a piece of the city’s history.

Walking in the heart of Naples it will be easy to find the Alley of the Sun, the Alley of Giants, the Alley of Purgatory's Fig, the Alley of Bakers, the Alley of Peace, the Alley of Spinsters and many more.

--VisitNaples.EU

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

ALLEYS OF NAPLES - 9

CAMPANIA, ITALY




If you love street life and human drama, Naples’ thousands of narrow side alleys are for you.

If you are a street photographer or photojournalist, the faded, imperfect, colorful, earthy and human-scaled buildings will provide fodder for endless digital images.

Monday, January 20, 2020

ALLEYS OF NAPLES - 8

CAMPANIA, ITALY



Passeggiare is the Italian word for stroll, especially an early evening one.

We are convinced that all that walking is why the average Neapolitan eats pizza, pasta and cheese in large quantities but is far less overweight than the typical American.

Sunday, January 19, 2020

ALLEYS OF NAPLES - 7

CAMPANIA, ITALY



Naples alleys are the most fun early in the morning – for people watching as laundry is hung, plants are watered and infants wander out to check on the world.

Or about an hour before till and hour after sunset – when the sun plays with the old buildings, banners and endless signs for bakeries, restaurants, cheese shops, chocolate shops and wine sellers.

Saturday, January 18, 2020

ALLEYS OF NAPLES - 6

CAMPANIA, ITALY




Many alleys – even streets and avenues – in Naples are so narrow that neighbors can talk to each other from their opposite balconies.

And talk they do, in a passionate, emphatic, boisterous way that adds to the atmosphere like an Italian street opera created just for you.

Friday, January 17, 2020

ALLEYS OF NAPLES - 5

CAMPANIA, ITALY



The cool thing about alleys in Naples is that they are still for locals, not tourists.

So instead of endless T-shirt and trinket stores, you find the main street retail mix of folks selling shoes, clothes, food, household goods and more.

Thursday, January 16, 2020

Unpacking The Spatial Implications Of Architecture's Accessibility Failures

Every architect, urban designer, interior designer and engineer MUST understand how to design for all. 

Bravo Archinect for this story:

Unpacking The Spatial Implications Of Architecture's Accessibility Failures: There is a particular type of obliviousness to the built environment that most of us have the privilege of experiencing day-to-day. This obliviousness relates not to architecture’s aesthetic values, but rather to architecture’s  accessibility out in the world. Built to Scale, an...

ALLEYS OF NAPLES - 4

CAMPANIA, ITALY



L’antica Pizzeria da Michele and Sorbillo are famous and draw long lines.

But there are dozens of worthy pizza places in Napoli.

Just don’t ruin good pizza with too many toppings.

The best is crust, sauce, cheese and basil only (margarita) or marinera (no cheese).

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

ALLEYS OF NAPLES - 3

CAMPANIA, ITALY




Naples is a city of apartments, not single family houses.

Life takes place on the balconies along the narrow alleys.

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

ALLEYS OF NAPLES - 2

CAMPANIA, ITALY



Look up when you enter a Naples alley. 

You will see flags, signs, old street lights, great architecture, colorful people and more.

Monday, January 13, 2020

ALLEYS OF NAPLES - 1

CAMPANIA, ITALY



Despite what false internet posts and some guide books tell you, most alleys in Naples are safe for tourists.

Just be alert, like you would in any major city in the U.S.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

SIMPLY AMAZED THAT THIS BLOG HAS 220,000 UNIQUE VISITORS


THANKS TO EVERYONE WHO HAS READ ONE OF OUR POSTS ON TRAVEL, WHEELCHAIR ACCESS, URBAN DESIGN, HUMAN RIGHTS, SUSTAINABILITY, ANIMAL WELFARE AND OTHER IMPORTANT ISSUES

Little Mouse, who depends on us for food, water, mil treats and love
We have now published more than 2,500 posts over just shy of a decade.

We have shared more than 2,000 original photographs, sharing images from North America to South America to Europe, Africa and Asia.

The amount of text would fill nearly four books.

Today, we want to focus on taking care stray cats.

We live in Little Havana and love its authenticity and diversity.

But sadly, it is one of the No. 1 places to dump unwanted felines in all of South Florida.

We live on a tiny lot, but have 2 bowls of water, 2 bowls of food and 4 cat shelters on it.

We have cared for nearly 50 outside cats in the past five years.

Our Siamese baby Honeybear continues to be our first inside rescue.

But at any given time we have a trio of regulars who depend on us to fill their water and milk bowls several times a day while filling their food dishes every other hour.

We donate locally, nationally and globally to dozens of cat sanctuaries and other efforts to spay/neuter cats.

The total amount of our year-round cat care and giving equals something between five and 10 percent of our household income.

We strongly encourage others to do the same – even if you can only afford to dedicate one percent of your earnings to taking care of animals who need us.


Ginger, one of our beloved outside babies




Saturday, January 11, 2020

ROMA, ITALIA

BASILICA DI SANTA MARIA IN TRASTEVERE


Nestled in a quiet corner of Trastevere's focal square, this is said to be the oldest church dedicated to the Virgin Mary in Rome. 

In its original form, it dates from the early 3rd century, but a major 12th-century makeover saw the addition of a Romanesque bell tower and a glittering facade. 

The portico came later, added by Carlo Fontana in 1702. Inside, the 12th-century mosaics are the headline feature.

--Lonely Planet

Friday, January 10, 2020

ROME -- INCIDENTAL -- 12

 IL MESSAGGERO ICONIC HEADQUARTERS



Il Messaggero was founded in December 1878.

On 1 January 1879 the first issue of Il Messaggero was published under the management of Luigi Cesana.

The paper aimed at being the newspapers of newspapers and at providing its readers with all opinions and all events.

Once with a circulation of nearly 400,000, it now sells fewer than 90,000 copies per day.

--Wikipedia

Thursday, January 9, 2020

ROME -- INCIDENTAL -- 11

FORNO


Forno Roscioli is one of Rome's top bakeries, much loved by lunching locals who crowd here for luscious sliced pizza, prize pastries and hunger-sating supplì (risotto balls). 

The pizza margherita is superb, if messy to eat, and there's also a counter serving hot pastas and vegetable side dishes.


--Lonely Planet

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

ROME -- INCIDENTAL -- 10

ROME



Rome’s historic centre’s main sights are free and easy to visit in a meandering wander, stopping for lunch, a coffee or ice cream for an energy burst. 

Don’t miss the Pantheon, a magnificently preserved ancient Roman temple, with a circular hole in the huge domed roof open to the heavens.

A couple of streets away is the splendid Piazza Navona, Rome’s elegant showcase square. 

A short amble further and you’re at the foaming, massive Trevi Fountain, and the baroque Spanish Steps, a grand stairway that’s perfect for taking a perch and watching the world go by.

Close by, the Piazza del Popolo is an impressive oval-shaped square complete with an Egyptian obelisk, home to some wonderful Caravaggio masterpieces in the Santa Maria del Popolo church.


--Lonely Planet

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

ROME -- INCIDENTAL -- 9

CHURCHES IN ROME



Rome’s earliest churches date from the 4th century, built by the Emperor Constantine; the most notable of the many churches that he commissioned is the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano. 

Reformed into its present shape in the 5th century, it was the model on which many subsequent basilicas were based. 

Other showstoppers of the period include the Basilica di Santa Maria in Trastevere and the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore, though they have been much altered since. 

A second wave of church-building hit Rome in the period between the 8th and 12th centuries, and the Renaissance period added still more architectural masterpieces. 

The architectural period that most shaped Rome’s churches, however, was the Baroque, whose opulent style mirrored the splendour, power and fury of the Counter-Reformation.


--Lonely Planet

Monday, January 6, 2020

ROME -- INCIDENTAL -- 8

ARCHITECTURE IN ROME



From ancient ruins and Renaissance basilicas, to baroque churches and hulking fascist palazzi, Rome’s architectural legacy is unparalleled.

Michelangelo, Bramante, Borromini and Bernini are among the architects who have stamped their genius on Rome’s remarkable cityscape, which features some of the Western world’s most celebrated buildings. 

But it’s not all about history. 

In recent years a number of high-profile building projects have drawn the world’s top architects to Rome, their futuristic designs provoking discussion, debate and soul-searching among the city’s loquacious and passionate critics.

--Lonely Planet

Sunday, January 5, 2020

ROME -- INCIDENTAL -- 7

CENTRO STORICO



A tightly packed tangle of cobbled alleyways, Renaissance palaces, ancient ruins and baroque piazzas, the historic centre is the Rome many come to see. 

Its theatrical streets teem with boutiques, cafes, trattorias and stylish bars, while market traders and street artists work its vibrant squares. 

The Pantheon and Piazza Navona are the star turns, but you’ll also find a host of monuments, museums and churches, many with works by the likes of Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Bernini et al. 

--Lonely Planet


Saturday, January 4, 2020

ROME -- INCIDENTAL -- 6

MONUMENTO NAZIONALE A VITTORIO EMANUELE II, PIAZZA VENEZIA




Officially known as the Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II, the enormous white marble monument that dominates Piazza Venezia was built as a tribute to the first king of a united Italy, Victor Emmanuel II.

As King of Sardinia and victor over the Austrian army in Lombardy, Victor Emmanuel had become a symbol of the Risorgimento, the movement for a united Italy. 

After his army joined forces with Garibaldi and defeated the papal army, the Kingdom of Italy was proclaimed in 1861 with Victor Emmanuel as king.

Friday, January 3, 2020

ROME -- INCIDENTAL -- 5

 SANT'ANDREA DELLA VALLE SUNSET



Sant'Andrea della Valle is a minor basilica in the rione of Sant’Eustachio of the city of Rome, Italy. 

The basilica is the general seat for the religious order of the Theatines.

It is located at Piazza Vidoni, 6 at the intersection of Corse Vittorio Emanuele (facing facade) and Corso Rinascimento.

--Wikipedia

Thursday, January 2, 2020

ROME -- INCIDENTAL -- 4

TESTACCIO



Testaccio may not be Rome’s prettiest neighborhood, but its rich history more than makes up for it.

In antiquity, the district was home to the Emporium port, where the bulk of the Romans’ food supply funneled into the city. 

Olive oil, grains, and other essential foodstuffs arrived in terracotta vessels called amphorae, and once emptied were disposed of in an outdoor dumpsite. 

The ancient Monte dei Cocci, or Monte Testaccio hill, composed of around 53 million broken amphorae, still looms today.

Centuries later, Testaccio housed Europe’s biggest abattoir, giving rise to rustic, Roman dishes like trippa alla romana and oxtail stew. 

It was in this neighborhood that the city’s beloved team, AS Roma, had their first football pitch, and where rowdy locals still gather to take in a match. 

Nowadays, Testaccio is hailed as a bastion of Roman culinary excellence, home to some of the Capital’s best eateries.

We’ll take that over charming piazzas and cobblestoned streets any day.

--Romeing.it

Wednesday, January 1, 2020

HAPPY NEW YEAR

FOR THE FIRST TIME IN MY LIFE, 
RESOLVE TO PAY ATTENTION TO MY HEALTH

From the time I was little, I ate whatever I wanted in whatever quantity made me feel full.

It’s a long story – one that will be told on this blog sometime in 2020 – but suffice to say my mom was severely mentally ill and often abusive.

In her rare times of being lucid and contrite, she would cook an insane amount of food for me as a way of saying sorry.

A little kid, barely 5, would be served enough lasagna, garlic bread, veal cutlet and cake to feed a crew of Olympic swimmers in training.

Fruits and vegetables were rarely on the dinner table.

Thus began a century of associating 5,000+ calorie days with being loved.

Feeling down, eat an entire pizza.

Celebrating something great, get $300 worth of food from a $100 gourmet brunch.

I turned 55 in 2019 and by the end of the year, decided that maybe another round of buying bigger pants, shirts and belts…was not the answer.

So I am on my journey.

Healthy eating and exercising seems as exotic and faraway to me as the images of Marrakech, Morocco displayed at the top and bottom of this page.

But day by day, I am getting used to shopping healthy, cooking healthy, eating healthy.

Wish me luck as I add some healthy moderation to my life.